About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
schools there and i was -- when i was in the second grade, was in the inner city, one of the poorer neighborhoods in the city. so it was something i thought about since i was a little kid. and so when the case went to the supreme court, i was obviously very interested in following it because it was personal. >> host: talk about the personal connection. i always like to ask that before we get into the meat of it. when you were busing to the inner city, did you have a particularly stance on the question of desegregation and school integrace. >> guest: when you're a kid you don't thing about it. when i was reading at the reaction of the kids in the the '7s when they started buzzing -- busing, a lot of the kids were saying, i like this school, and as i got older i started to think about not only going to schooled and being surrounded by poverty i didn't see in my neighborhoods in the suburbs, but then the school is attended, there was tracking so you had the regular program, honors, and then we had advance programs, and those were cut very closely along race and class lines. so as a kid
with that? how do we deal with the fact that in most cities and urban areas, it's not even a possibility. it's not even feasible anymore. >> host: is their popular opinion based on this sort of legal term we have seen now? >> guest: legally, it's very hard. i write about the school choice movement and i really think that is got into the consciousness of the american public and people really feel like they deserve the right to have a choice of schools. so i think turning around and saying okay, let's implement this busing program and you have to send your kids here, don't know if it's politically feasible that way and it's a controlled choice. it's a choice program but the choices are managed. so i think that has -- just in terms of where people live i think. you have had cities and some schools are becoming -- in the suburbs are becoming more diverse and in the inner cities you have the white middle-class moving back in in washington d.c. and new york so there are some opportunities. but i don't think forced busing, it's not going to be at. >> host: i'm glad you mentioned that. it's sort of
wrote it is i go out to the public schools when i was in second grade in the inner city in the housing projects in the poor neighborhoods in the city so it was something i had thought about actively since i was a little kid and so when it came into the supreme court i was interested in following that >> host: talking about the personal pieces i like to ask people their personal connection in the story when we get into the meat of it did you have a particularly stance on bus segregation? >> guest: i think they don't think about it and looking back to when i was looking at the reaction from the kids in the 70's when they started busting a lot of the kids would say i like it at this school. they didn't think about it but as i got older i started to think about not only going to schools and being surrounded by poverty that i didn't see in my neighborhood in the suburbs, but you know, at the same time in the schools that i had attended there was tracking so you have the regular program and in the advanced program they are close race on the class lines and so as a kid you absorb that and sta
'd segregation between school districts on long island. .. >> host: when you were bussed into the inner city, did you have a particularly sort of strident stance on the question of desegregation, the question of school integration? >> guest: i think as kids, you don't think about it. looking bag, i mean, even when i was reading back at the reaction for kids in the 70s when they started busing the kids, said, you know, i like it at the school, and they didn't think about it. it was the same way for me, but as we got older, i started to think about not only going to schools and being surrounded by poverty that i didn't see in the neighborhood in the suburbs, that's, you know, that's definitely eye opening, but at the same time, the schools that i attended, there was tracking so you had the regular program honors, and you had the advanced program, and those were cut very closely along in the class lines, and as a kid, you absorb that and think about it, and i remember being in high school and one of the only classes i took where television mixed between the tracks, it was a global studies course, i
as -- in rural new york higher fertility rates than soon to become new york city. as you have a more urban country, a less rural country. children survive at the higher rate, you're naturally getting people to have fewer babies. again, these are good effects. that's one of the things i try to mention in the book is that, you know, to preserve the overall effect on this creates problems. not every one of the causes is a problem. some are wonderful things. and even wonderful things can, you know, have ill and adverse effects. >> well, why would urbanization lower fertility? >> guest: well, lots of reasons. one which is simple cost. when you urbanize, everything costs more. the higher your population density, the higher your costs of living. higher land costs, higher child care costs, higher education costs, and not just that. as we look back historically and we move from, you know, to an industrial society. in a society children are free work. right. you have seven kids and workingen a a family farm by the time the kids are 10 years old. those are helping hands. when you live in the city and
city. as you have the more urban country into lesra my country a country where children survive at a much higher rate, you are naturally getting people to have fewer babies. again these are good effects. that is one of the things i try to mention in the book is that to observe that with the overall effect on this creates problems and that isn't to say everyone is itself a problem and some of them are wonderful things. even wonderful things can have ill and adverse effects. >> host:>> host: why would urban lower fertility? >> for lots of reasons. one of which is cost. when you are but nice everything costs more. the higher your population density the higher your cost of living and higher land costs hired childcare costs and higher education cost and not just that but if we look back historically and we move from an agrarian society to an industrial society children are free work, right? you have seven kids and to work on a family farm and by the time the kids are 10 years old there is a helping hand. when you live in the city and working in factories and doing increasingly mechan
and was a progressive city and i just sort of -- i didn't study business. i studied philosophy and religion and world literature and history and pretty much the humanities. when i started the business i had no economics and business or anything but i knew that i was going to have a really low prices and i was going to pay really well, and there was going to be a different kind of business because it wasn't going to be like those of their businesses. and of course, once you get into the real world and have to meet a payroll and have to pay your bills and you are undercapitalized, your philosophy of business can he vault. it's interesting to me because a lot of my friends from the movement saw me as a trader that i have become gone over the dark side. yet the business was struggling. we managed to lose 50% of the capitol. we started with $45,000 lost 23. my girlfriend at the time that co-founded the business with me, we were living in the store on the third floor making $200 a month each. we below minimum wage even back then. so, i just began to move away from the philosophy. as i was trying to figure
i was young and i went to the university of texas in austin and that's a pretty progressive city, and i just sort of eyes studied philosophy and religion and world literature and history in pretty much the humanities. so when i started the business i have no background in economics or business or anything that i knew that i was going to have really low prices and i was going to pay really well and i was going to be a different kind of business because it wasn't going to be like those other businesses. and of course once you get into the real world you have to give the payroll and you have to pay your bills and your undercapitalized, your philosophy of business evolves. it was very interesting to me because a lot of my friends from the co-op saw me as a traitor that i had become -- on over to the dark side and yet the business was struggling. we managed to lose 50% of our capital in the first year. we started with $45,000 and lost 23,000. my girlfriend at the time who cofounded the business with me we were living in a store in the third floor and making $200 a month each. way belo
, major cities as they still skyrocket, the cost of having children has increased. it fuels this entire post 2008 period. the things that people cannot do themselves out of have gone up considerably. the things that have declined somewhat, things identified as luxuries, it used to take over a week of work to buy a television set. clothing used to be much more expensive. thanks to the fact that it comes from third third world countries now, it is all very cheap. our issue is the things you can't get away from. i did my own experiments with it, not deliberately. my husband and i decided we had to cut art expenses. that is it for "the new york times." we are going to cut it out, and so we canceled "the new york times." our health insurance is then going up by $100 per month. and i am now $50 behind and then some. the final kicker was "the new york times" turned around and said to stop that. and we are both writers. i read "the new york times." and that was the end of it. but that is the thing. there is only so much you can cut. >> host: i think you should offer more free steak dinners. >>
famously took off in major cities still skyrocketing as people in glass houses. the cost of having children has increased and has continued to in greece to the entire poster destiny. as other things have stagnated. so the things people cannot get themselves out of have gone up considerably. the things that are declined by the things we identify as luxury. it is to take over week of work to buy a television set. now it's barely a day. closing used to be much more expensive. next to the fact it comes to the third world, it's very cheap. our issue is the things you can't get away from. i joke in the book i did my own experience, not deliberately, my husband and i decided we had to cut our expense is we proudly go through and really cuts it for "the new york times." we are reading it online anyways. we are going to cut it out. so we canceled "the new york times." we literally are proud of ourselves for two weeks because this is a $50 a month expense. we then get them about their health insurance is going up by $100 a month and is going to pay for less on top of that. so i supposed to be $50 a h
towards a freer environment of the city and move from the south to the north and that is what most people did. in the process of doing that, some of it became politicized. >> host: because they expected things to be markedly different in the north. they didn't think racism was in the north. >> guest: in the north they are not going to be murdered for taking a stand. and so in the relatively freer environment they are able to really create the conditions for the modern movement. >> host: talk about some of the people of the movement. those in sncc and those nclc and others. who were the people who'd -- was a king, was that nocco max? was that the death of medgar evers? >> guest: all of the above. all of them had different roles. one of the ways in which i try to explain this is rosa parks made martin luther king possible. martin luther king didn't make rosa parks possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give a per seat on the montgomery bus martin luther king would have simply been an articulate, well meaning baptist minister. it's because of rosa parks that we are talking
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)